Mandurah Madness

The recent lock downs for the COVID 19 outbreak had a very strange effect. Living in York we don’t visit the coast very often, but as soon as the Western Australian government said we could leave our region all I wanted to do was go to the coast. I suppose it’s a bit like being on a diet and then spending all day obsessing over food. Well with the lockdown over we put the dog in kennels and headed down to Mandurah for a couple of days to get an oceanic fix.

 

 

Now the plan was to spend three days visiting some reserves around, but as Robert Burns once said “The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men / Gang aft a-gley.”. The first spot we went out to was Lake McLarty, but there was no water in the lake and no birds to be seen. To cap it all the weather was grim – a storm front was closing in. So we decided to cut our losses and head in land to Pinjarra and walk along the Murray River and visit the Edenvale Heritage Tearoom. Well the tearooms were still shut because of COVID so we settled for a walk along the the river.

 

Eastern Osprey by Paul Amyes on 500px.com

Eastern osprey (Pandion cristatus subs leucocephalus) at Lake McLarty Nature Reserve near Mandurah in Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 mk ii with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm lens. Exposure: 1/500, f7.1 ISO 320.

 

Nankeen Night Heron by Paul Amyes on 500px.com

Nankeen Night Heron, Nycticorax caledonicus subsp mannillenis. Pinjara, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm lens. Exposure: 1/500, f6.3, ISO 1600.

 

Australian Darter by Paul Amyes on 500px.com

A male Australian darter (Anhinga melanogaster subspecies novaehollandiae) aka as the snake bird. Pinjarra, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f6.3 at ISO 3200.

 

Paul Amyes taking it easy from the rigours of bird watching on a concrete sofa on the banks of the Murray River in Pinjarra, Western Australia. The sofa is part of the “Take Your Seat Art Project by Fremantle Arts Centre and Alcoa.

 

The next day the weather was grimmer than the previous day’s. We were wearing enough clothes to make Captain Scott of the Antarctic fame look severely underdressed. The morning’s activities were to be based at the Creery Wetlands Reserve which was only a short way from where we were staying. Although wet and bitterly cold we had more success than the previous day. It is amazing how much wildlife can be packed into a small area just minutes from a city centre. If you are in the area it is well worth visiting, don’t let the fact that the entrance makes it look like an off-shore detention camp put you off. As you cross the bridge you get the feeling a couple of Border Force goons could jump out of the bushes and indefinitely detain you. Once in side you can commune with nature to your hearts content.

 

Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The entrance to Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve in Western Australia.

 

Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
One of the two bird hides at Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve in Western Australia.

 

Helen bird watching at the Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve, Mandurah, Western Australia.

 

Pacific Black Duck by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pacific black duck, Anas superciliosa. Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve, Western Australia.

 

Western Gerygone by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Western Gerygone, Gerygone fusca. Creery Wetland Reserve, Western Australia.

 

Great Egret In Flight by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A great egret (Ardea alba modesta) flying over the Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve in Western Australia.

 

Inland Thornbill by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Inland Thornbill, Acanthiza apicalis. Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve, Western Australia.

 

Black Swans by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Black swans (Cygnus atratus) feeding. Creery Wetlands Reserve, Western Australia.

 

1080 Poison Risk by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
An eastern osprey, Pandion cristatus subs leucocephalus, perched on a sign warning about 1080 baiting. Creery Wetalnds Nature Reserve, Mandurah, Western Australia.

 

Western Grey Kangaroo by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Western Grey Kangaroo, Macropus fuliginosus. Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve, Western Australia.

Swanning Around*

Rainbow Lorikeet by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) is a feral bird in Perth that commonly nests on the platforms at the base of palm fronds. Olympus Pen EP-5 with OLYMPUS M.45mm F1.8 lens. Exposure: 1/25 sec, f5.8 at ISO 200.

 

Warning this blog entry contains avian themes!

The other day I had to take the car into be serviced in Victoria Park near the Causeway. This meant I had time to kill so I decided to take a walk along the northern bank of the Swan River Foreshore. I hadn’t been along there for ages and there has been some recent redevelopment of the area so I decided to have a sticky beak. These are a few of the pictures I took as I wandered around.

 

Little Corellas by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Little Corellas (Cacatua sanguinea) Swan River foreshore, Perth, Western Australia. Olympus Pen EP-5 with OLYMPUS M.45mm F1.8 lens. Exposure: 1/800 sec, f4 at ISO 200.

 

 

Australian darter (Anhinga novaehollandiae) by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Australian darter (Anhinga novaehollandiae) on the Swan River foreshore, Perth, Western Australia. Olympus Pen EP-5 with OLYMPUS M.45mm F1.8 lens. Exposure: 1/2000 sec, f4 at ISO 200.

 

Little Dove by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Little Dove. The Duyfken (Little Dove in English) replica moored at Elizabeth Quay on the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia. Olympus Pen EP-5 with OLYMPUS M.17mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f8 at ISO 200.

 

First Contact by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
First Contact , Elizabeth Quay in Perth, is a five metre tall artwork by Nyoongar artist Laurel Nannup. The work depicts the arrival of European settlers to Perth. As the European boats arrived, the local Nyoongar people believed that these ships, were their past ancestors returning from the sea. Olympus Pen EP5 with OLYMPUS M.17mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/400 sec, f8 at ISO 200.

 

Elizabeth Quay Bridge by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The 20-metre high suspension bridge is an iconic architectural feature of Elizabeth Quay. The bridge forms part of the popular ‘bridges’ recreational route along the Swan River and provides a link between the promenades, the island and Barrack Street Jetty. Olympus Pen EP5 with OLYMPUS M.17mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f8 at ISO 200.

 

*Swanning around and swanning about mean to move about aimlessly, irresponsibly and in a carefree manner. Related terms are swan around or about, swans around or about, swanned around or about. When the terms swanning around and swanning about first appeared in the late nineteenth century, they simply described the process of swimming like a swan. Today’s meaning of the term swanning about has its origins in World War II, interestingly. At that time, swanning around and swanning about described the movements of tanks in battle, in seemingly aimless maneuvers. The term made its way into mainstream English to mean anyone moving about in an irresponsibly carefree or aimless pattern. Swanning around and swanning about are primarily British terms, they are rarely seen in the United States.

http://grammarist.com/usage/swanning-around-and-swanning-about/