Mark Twain Was Right

Pterostylis sanguinea by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dark Banded Greenhood Orchid. York Golf Course.Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM10, Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens, Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: 1/13th sec, f8, ISO 200.

 

 “A good walk spoiled.”

Mark Twain

I’ve been hanging around the York Golf Course. Not to play golf you understand – I’ve never understood the compulsion to dress up in silly sweaters and shoes and drag a bunch of sticks in a cart around a large field while trying intermittently to knock a ball into a hole. No the reason why I’ve taken to loitering at the York Golf Course is that is home to a significant number and variety of wildflowers. Not on the fairways off course – they are barren bits of grass with the occasional large hole filled with sand. No the interesting stuff lies in the rough between the fairways. It’s not without its hazards mind you. Those people in their funny clothes reckon they can hit a ball straight down the fairway to the flag in the hole – well most of ’em can’t, they slice the shot and the balls land like a barrage of misplaced shells in an American artillery strike. The ground is littered with balls in among the bushes. I thought the rules state that you have to play the ball from where it landed, well the number of “lost” balls in the rough at York plainly shows that this is not happening. It’s so bad that next time I visit I’m seriously contemplating wearing a helmet. You can never be too careful.

Seek and You Shall Find

Dark Banded Greenhood by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dark Banded Greenhood, or Pterostylis sanguinea, found at the base of Wave Rock near Hyden in Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Olympus FL600r speed light mounted off camera.. Exposure: 1/250th sec, f8, ISO 400.

 

 

As you might have gathered from my last post I didn’t pay a lot of attention to Wave Rock itself. Besides watching tourists I spent my time looking for orchids. I had seen on my Facebook feed someone had found some dark banded greenhoods at the base of the rock so I spent ages walking along the vegetation looking for a small green and brown plant amongst a sea of other small green and brown plants. Amazingly I found a patch of half a dozen under a clump of sedge. I did my usual thing of lying down to photograph them. So there I am my torso in amongst the sedge and my legs out on the path quietly photographing flowers.

Me in orchid mode lying on the ground. Photo by Helen Amyes.

After a little while of me lying completely flat trying to get the best possible viewpoint a woman walks along the path and finds my prostrate form. Perhaps being a fan of the “cosy crime” genre she thinks she has found a body, or at best someone who has collapsed sick while sightseeing. So she kneels down to touch me – I suppose to check whether I’m alive or not. I say “Hullo” and she jumps out of her skin and looks like she could keel over with a heart attack. I quickly explain that I’m fine really, and it’s very kind of her to be so concerned, but I’m just photographing some flowers. From the look she gave me I think she would have rather found a dead body than a mad man lying in the mud taking photos.

Dark Banded Greenhood by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Up close and personal with a dark banded geenhood. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens, and Olympus FL600r speed light. Exposure: 1/250th sec, f4, ISO 400.

 

 

 

Fantastic Spring Show

According to those that know it has been an amazing spring here in the Avon Valley. We’ve had rainfall that hasn’t been seen for decades and we’ve had a flush of wildflowers that hasn’t been equalled for fifty years. It has been frustrating as I’ve only managed to get out and photograph the orchids three times, but when I did get out it was beyond superlatives. Here are the highlights.

 

Dark Banded Greenhood by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pterostylis sanguinea, or , , Mount Observation, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d, Sigma 105mm f2.8 macro lens and Canon 430 EX Speedlite. Exposure: AE priority 1/50th sec, f16, ISO 3200 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

Hairy-stemmed Snail Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The Hairy-stemmed Snail Orchid (Pterostylis nana) most common and widespread of the Pterostylis species in Western Australia. Mt. Observation, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Sigma 105mm f2.8 macro lens and Canon 430EX Speedlite. Exposure: Aperture priority with -1 stop exposure compensation 1/100th sec, f8 at ISO 400.

 

Wallflower Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The wallflower orchid, aka the common donkey orchid (diuris corymbosa) lives up to it’s name and is commonly found in the south-west of Western Australia. Mount Observation, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Sigma 105mm f2.8 macro lens and Canon 430 EX Speedlite. Exposure: aperture priority mode with -5 stops exposure compensation, high-speed flash sync 1/2000, f11 at ISO 200.

 

White Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
White Spider Orchid (Caladenia longicaudia). Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro and Metz ring flash. Exposure: ƒ/16.0 , 1/80s, at ISO 800, manual mode with -2 stops exposure.

 

Purple Enamel Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Easily recognisable the Purple Enamel Orchid has glossy purple flowers which fade and become pink with age. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens and Metz ring flash.

 

Dancing Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) is also known as the antelope orchid and the bee orchid. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM10 with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens, & Metz ring flash. Exposure:

 

Lemon Scented Sun Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The lemon scented sun orchid, also known as the vanilla orchid,(Thelymitra antennifera) is named after its strong lemon scent. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro and Metz ring flash. Exposure: 1/160th sec, f8 ISO 200.

 

Blue China Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Recognised by its intense blue colour, the Blue China Orchid is like the Thelymitra species in that it is heat sensitive and the flowers close at night on overcast days. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz mecablitz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: manual mode, 1/100th sec, f8 at ISO 200.

 

Fringed Mantis Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The Fringed Mantis Orchid (Caladenia falcata) is also known as the green spider orchid. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens and Metz ring flash.

 

Custard Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Custard orchid (Thelymitra villas), York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM-10 with Olympus M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro lens. Exposure: AE priority 1/320th sec, f8 at ISO 200.

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