American Style

Nankeen Kestral by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Nankeen Kestrel with prey at Marwick’s Barn in York, Western Australia. Canon EOS 550d with Sigma 150-600mm f4-6.3 OS. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f6.3 at ISO 320.

 

The other day I’d been up on Mount Brown (which is a grand name for a moderately sized hill) looking for interesting birds to photograph. The conditions were great, but the birds uncooperative so I gave up and started driving home. At the bottom of the hill I caught out of the corner of my eye a nankeen kestrel hunting on an empty block. It swooped down into the long grass and quickly took off again obviously holding something. So I did something I’d never thought that I’d do. I’ve just been really getting into this bird photography malarkey and have been watching YouTube videos for tips. Mostly British videos, but the occasional American one. I’d noticed that quite a few of the American ones had the photographers driving around looking for birds and photographing then from the car. Well I started to follow this bird in the car. It didn’t go far. It landed on the power lines outside of Marwick’s Barn obviously to catch its breath. It obviously decided that the power lines was no place to deal with the kicking and struggling mouse so it moved to the top of a nearby power pole. So I pulled up on to the dirt shoulder and hanging out of the driver’s side window I photographed madly.

 

Nankeen Kestral by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Nankeen Kestrel with prey at Marwick’s Barn in York, Western Australia.

There were no niceties, the kestrel didn’t even both to dispatch its prey before eating – it just pulled the mouse apart. I continued snapping frantically. When everything was finished the kestrel noticed the sound of the camera and gave me a hard stare. Rumbled! With a look of disdain it flew off.

 

Nankeen Kestral by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Nankeen Kestrel with prey at Marwick’s Barn in York, Western Australia.

 

 

Marwick's Shed by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Marwick’s Shed also called Marwick’s Barn. Constructed from 1876. Was used for transporting supplies to the goldfields prior to the completion of the Perth-Coolgardie railway line. Olympus OMD EM10 mk I with Olympus 17mm f2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/400, f8 at ISO 200.

 

 

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