Lake Claremont

 

Originally what is now Lake Claremont was a swamp with a series of small pools edged with reeds and then surrounded by paperbark trees. There was abundant plant an animal life and it was an important hunting and gathering place for the Mooro clan of the Nyoongar in the warmer months of the year.

 

Lake Claremont by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The bird observation platform allows visitors to watch the birds in the grasses and reeds at Lake Claremont.

 

In 1831 European settlers began to clear the land for farming and by the 1890’s there were market gardens and a then state of the art dairy farm. Things looked good and the area prospered. However, this state of affairs was short lived as by the turn of the Twentieth Century the water level rose and the farms were flooded and a permanent lake which rises and falls with the seasons was formed. In the 1950’s Claremont Town Council reclaimed large areas for a rubbish tip and renamed it Lake Claremont in the process. In the 1960’s it was decided to beautify the lake and its surrounds. Sections were infilled to create a golf course and the school playing fields. In time two small bird sanctuary islands were created and there has been a move to manage the the lake in a more ecological manner. The Friends of Lake Claremont are an enthusiastic and very active bunch of local residents and volunteers who have undertaken to assist in the conservation and enhancement of Lake Claremont. There activities have been crucial in weed eradication programs and revegetation projects working in tandem with pupils from  Scotch College and Graylands Primary School. They also have annual public events including Clean Up Australia Day, National Tree Day and Celebrate Lake Claremont Day (community fair). More details can be found on their website.

 

Lake Claremont by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The infamous Lake Claremont crocodile. Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

So that was then and this is now. What does the lake offer today? Well the wetlands of the Swan Coastal Plain are internationally acknowledged as a bio-diversity hotspot having a greater number of endemic species than most other regions in Australia. Since colonisation three quarters of the wetlands have been drained for urban development. Those that remain are adversely effected by the introduction of feral animals and plants. In this context Lake Claremont is like a biosphere. In the past ten years or so eBird Australia has listed 116 species of bird that can be found on or around the lake which makes it somewhat of a birders paradise. The path around the lake and the bird observation platform make it easy to spot birds all year round. To make it so that you know what you are looking for you can down load an illustrated brochure listing the birds from the Town of Claremont website.

 

Lake Claremont by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Lake Claremont has a dual use path around its edge which is popular with runners and cyclists.

In addition to the nature based activities there is a 3 Km dual use path that circumnavigates the lake which is very popular with walkers, runners and cyclists. Dogs are welcome on a lead. The walk is enjoyable all year round and if you start the car park and head off in a clockwise direction then you can stop at the TeeBox Cafe shortly before returning to the car park. For the youngsters who need to burn off some energy before looking at the ducks there are two playgrounds. If dad doesn’t care for looking at the ducks then he has the option of playing a quick nine holes of golf.

 

Dit by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A juvenile pied stilt (Himantopus himantopus) at Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Marli by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A black swan (black ) gathering nesting material at Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Bardoongooba by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A pair of Australian Shovelers (Australian) at Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Kalyong by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A pair of grey teals (Anas gracilis) at Lake Claremont in Western Australia.

 

Kwilom by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A purple swamp hen (Purple), Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Rainbow Lorikeet by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Rainbow lorikeets (Rain) were introduced to Western Australiafrom the eastern states of Australia. Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Wimbin by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pink-eared ducks (Malacorhynchus membranaceus) at Lake Claremont in Western Australia.

 

Dit by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Called Dit by the Nyoongar this juvenile pied stilt (Himantopus himantopus) feeds at Lake Claremont, Western Australia.

 

Bardoongooba by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Bardoongooba called Australian Shovelers (Anas rhynchotis) by European settlers can be readily seen on Lake Claremont.

 

Out Of Step

Blackadder Lake by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Juvenile pied stilts (Himantopus leuccocephalus) at Blackadder Lake, Vivash, Western Australia. Panasonic Lumix G85 with a Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure 1/1250, f6.3, ISO 800.

 

The other day we were down at Blackadder Lake in Vivash. We had gone to photograph Sacred Kingfishers, but the only glimpse we got of them was as we got out of the car. When we got to the lake we became entranced by the antics of a pair of juvenile pied stilts. They moved across the lake shallows in perfect synchronised formation, until the need for a tasty morsel became too much.

Blackadder Lake by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Juvenile pied stilts (Himantopus leuccocephalus) at Blackadder Lake, Vivash, Western Australia. Panasonic Lumix G85 with a Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure 1/1250, f6.3, ISO 800.

 

 

Blackadder Lake by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Juvenile pied stilts (Himantopus leuccocephalus) at Blackadder Lake, Vivash, Western Australia. Panasonic Lumix G85 with a Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure 1/1250, f6.3, ISO 800.