Wandering in Wongermine Reserve

 

OK that maybe a little bit melodramatic, but there was no doubt that getting out and about after a few weeks of lockdown was a bit of a rush! So where did I go? What did I do with this new found liberty? Well I went to Wongamine Reserve near Toodyay to look for two types of orchid and do the walk trail. Pretty sad eh?

 

The main entrance to Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

 

 

The reserve isn’t really visited any more the gates are locked and many of the signs broken or over grown. In fact speaking of overgrown the walk trail is so overgrown in places that I  suggest that if you do want to visit and walk there that you take a GPS and download the walk track from Trails WA and follow that.

The reserve was closed a while ago and many of the trails and signs have fallen into a state of disrepair. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Some of the vehicle tracks have not been used for a long time allowing termites to build mounds on them. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

This was one of only two trail markesr on the walk trail. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Was there anything positive about the visit? Well yes there was actually. The woodland is home to quite a variety of bird life – I didn’t photograph any as I was not carrying a suitable lens as I had gone to photograph orchids. I would expect from walking through the bush that would be quite a display of wildflowers in spring which would make the journey well worth while. There were quite a few species of dragonflies as well which at the time surprised me for some reason.

 

Wongamine Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Australian Emperor Dragonfly (Anax papuensis) Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Did I find the orchids? Well the Winter Spider Orchid is only 6cm tall with a 2cm flower and the Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchid is 10cm tall with a 9mm flower  and considering that the reserve is 330 ha of bushland I think I did well to find anything at all. I didn’t find any Winter Spider Orchids, I have photographed them before at Babakin, but I found lots of the Bunny Orchids. In fact I never seen so many Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchids before. So all in all it was a great day out.

 

Wongamine Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchid, Eriochilus dilatatus subsp undulatus. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Spring Is Springing

Red Capped Robin by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Red Capped Robin, Petroica goodenovi, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm f4-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f6.3 at ISO 1000 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Tomorrow here in Western Australia is the first day of spring. I don’t think Mother Nature got the memo as the bush around York sprung into life a couple of weeks ago. Flowers are bursting into bloom and the birds are in a frenzy of nest building and dancing around trying to attract mates. This means that I have also sprung into action trying to document as much of thais activity as possible. The cameras are working over time.

 

Common Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The unusual lutea or “yellow” form of the common donkey orchid (Diuris corymbosa). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF 100mm f2.8 IS L macro lens. Exposure: 1/800 sec, f8 at ISO 400.

 

Green Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Green Spider Orchid, also known as the Fringed Mantis Orchid (Caladenia falcata). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/160 sec, f5.6 at ISO 400.

 

White Spider Orchids by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
White Spider Orchids, Caladenia longicauda, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority with off camera flash 1/50 sec, f11 at ISO 100 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

Winter Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Winter Donkey Orchid, Diuris brumalis, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/25 sec, f8 at ISO 100.

 

Brown Honeyeater by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Brown Honeyeater, Lichmera indistincta, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f13 at ISO 200 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Western Whistler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Female Western Whistler, Pachycephala occidentalis,, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f11 at ISO 200.

 

Blimey that was quick!

Spring is here and the bees are hard at work pollinating the almond trees in my garden.

It only seems like the other day I was blogging about winter coming and getting my wood supply in. Now after a very mild winter spring is breaking out all over. The fruit trees in my garden have been keeping the local bees very busy. And further afield the native terrestrial orchids are starting to bloom. I’ve never known them start quite so early, and I thought that last year was a prolific year, but this spring is looking to be even more bountiful.

A cowslip orchid being pollinated. Mokine, Western Australia.

 

Rosy-cheeked Donkey Orchid, Diuris aff. corymbosa, larger than the common donkey orchid and has reddish-brown labellum lobes hence the name.

 

A lemon scented sun orchid (Thelymitra antennifera) also known as vanilla orchid. Mokine, Western Australia.

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