A Long Walk On A Long Pier

When I was a kid one of the many rebuffs used was “take a long walk on a short pier” – it was, I suppose, a more imaginative way of saying get lost. Well whoever first coined the phrase hadn’t taken into account Busselton Jetty in Busselton Western Australia.

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Busselton Jetty is longest timber piled jetty in the southern hemisphere and is a popular tourist attraction. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/60 sec, f11 at ISO 100.

 

Busselton Jetty is the longest wooden jetty in the Southern Hemisphere and it is 1.81Km or 1.12 miles long. Building the jetty commenced in 1853 and it opened in 1865 and by the 1880’s it was already attracting tourists. By 1972 the jetty ceased operation as a commercial port and today it attracts a staggering 450,000 people per year.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The sculpture “Fish” (the sea in her belly) stares enigmatically out to sea by the Busselton Jetty. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/80 sec, f16 at ISO 400.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
X marks the spot. Over the course of the jetty’s 152 year history it has been extended several times. Each red X indicates the previous limit of the jetty Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/20 sec, f16 at ISO 100.

 

At the end of the jetty is the Underwater Observatory which takes visitor down 8m to the seabed where they can observe the huge variety of marine life that has made the jetty home.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
At the end of Busselton Jetty is the Underwater Observatory where you cab descend to a depth of 8 metres to view the marine life that calls the jetty home. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f5.6 at ISO 6400.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The piles that support the Busselton Jetty form a vertical reef. More than 300 species of tropical and sub-tropical corals, sponges, fish and invertebrates live there. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f5.6 at ISO 6400.

 

To get there you don’t have to walk, there is a solar-powered electric train, the Stocker Preston Express, which can carry up to 90 people. So now it is the case of a small train journey on a long pier.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Busselton Jetty is 1.81Km (1.12 miles) long and it has a train service that takes 90 passengers 1.7 Km to Underwater Observatory. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 IS L lens. Exposure: 1/200 sec, f5.6 at ISO 100.

 

Busselton Jetty by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The Jetty Train on Busselton Jetty takes passengers on a 1.7 kilometre journey across the calm, clear waters of Geographe Bay. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF 24-70mm f4 lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f8 at ISO 100.

 

TransPerth-Transhumance

For a while I had to commute to Perth from York. I did the first bit, York to Midland by car and then I did Midland to Perth by train. I discovered that I HATE commuting. It is soooo tedious. Then after a couple of weeks I get a new camera and just to test it I took a photo while on the train just to test it out more than anything else. When I eventually looked at it on my monitor an idea began to form in my head for a project. A couple more weeks later I discovered the video function on the camera and then I thought the project should be multi-media one made up of stills, video footage and audio recordings from my train commute. The result is TransPerth-Transhumance.

 

Snoozing on the train
Snoozing on the train – catching a few ZZZZs on the early morning train. The picture that started it all.

 

Transhumance is traditionally the movement of livestock from summer to winter pasture. Today most people are divorced from the need to earn a subsistence income from herding animals. In this post industrial society people now travel from their place of abode to their place of work. Everyday TransPerth, the public transport provider in the Western Australian city of Perth, moves literally thousands of people in a herd like manner from the outer suburbs to the CBD. This modern form of transhumance is not governed by the leisurely pace of pass of the seasons but by the frenetic demands of modern business which measures time in seconds. For those who care about such things the project was shot with an Olympus Pen EP-2, a Zuiko m4/3 17mm f2.8 and Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3 lenses and a Panasonic Lumix LX-5, all of which according to the internet experts are incapable of producing good results. Sound was recorded using a Zoom H2n audio recorder. The still images can be seen here