Wandering in Wongermine Reserve

 

OK that maybe a little bit melodramatic, but there was no doubt that getting out and about after a few weeks of lockdown was a bit of a rush! So where did I go? What did I do with this new found liberty? Well I went to Wongamine Reserve near Toodyay to look for two types of orchid and do the walk trail. Pretty sad eh?

 

The main entrance to Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

 

 

The reserve isn’t really visited any more the gates are locked and many of the signs broken or over grown. In fact speaking of overgrown the walk trail is so overgrown in places that I  suggest that if you do want to visit and walk there that you take a GPS and download the walk track from Trails WA and follow that.

The reserve was closed a while ago and many of the trails and signs have fallen into a state of disrepair. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Some of the vehicle tracks have not been used for a long time allowing termites to build mounds on them. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

This was one of only two trail markesr on the walk trail. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Was there anything positive about the visit? Well yes there was actually. The woodland is home to quite a variety of bird life – I didn’t photograph any as I was not carrying a suitable lens as I had gone to photograph orchids. I would expect from walking through the bush that would be quite a display of wildflowers in spring which would make the journey well worth while. There were quite a few species of dragonflies as well which at the time surprised me for some reason.

 

Wongamine Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Australian Emperor Dragonfly (Anax papuensis) Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

Did I find the orchids? Well the Winter Spider Orchid is only 6cm tall with a 2cm flower and the Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchid is 10cm tall with a 9mm flower  and considering that the reserve is 330 ha of bushland I think I did well to find anything at all. I didn’t find any Winter Spider Orchids, I have photographed them before at Babakin, but I found lots of the Bunny Orchids. In fact I never seen so many Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchids before. So all in all it was a great day out.

 

Wongamine Nature Reserve by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Crinkle-leafed Bunny Orchid, Eriochilus dilatatus subsp undulatus. Wongamine Nature Reserve, Toodyay, Western Australia.

 

In The Bag

The video is the short version of this article with a slide show of the best of this year’s orchids at the end.

 

 

It’s not for nothing that Western Australia is referred to as the “Wildflower State”. There are over 13,000 species of plant to be found, with new discoveries added every year. If we narrow it down to my particular area of interest – orchids – there are 394 species of terrestrial orchids in the South West Corner of the state. Some of these species are so specialised that are confined to very small areas and found nowhere else. Some species will not bloom unless there has been a bush fire the summer before, others if the winter rains are delayed or are insufficient will not put a show on either. This means that no two years are the same. An example of this is my favourite spot near where I live is prolific with the number of orchid species found there. When I first went I was simply amazed by the number of fringed mantis and white spider orchids that were flowering. Over the ensuing ten years I’ve seen such a display of those species since. This year there was a carpet of purple and pink enamels like I’ve never seen before. So this not knowing quite what you are going to find adds to the whole experience. On a few occasions I may be lucky enough to be able to access the flowers by car and a short walk, but most of the time I end up walking through the bush for anything up to four hours.

 

Pink Enamel Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pink enamel orchid, Elythranthera emarginata. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus 60mm f2.8 macro lens. Aperture priority, exposure: 1/800 sec, f5.6 at ISO 400.

 

Purple Enamel Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Purple Enamel Orchid, Elythranthera brunonis. Mokine, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus 60mm f2.8 macro lens and Metz 64AF-1 flash. Exposure: Aperture priority mode, 1/40 sec, f8 at ISO 200 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

The Canon EOS 6d camera with 100mm f2.8 macro lens that I used to use for photographing orchids alongside the Olympus EM 1 mk ii with 60mm f2.8 macro lens that I use now.

 

I approach photographing orchids as I would shooting a person’s portrait – using off camera flash and reflectors to fill shadows, separate from the background, bring out the shape and textures. Too many botanic studies show indistinct photos where the subject does not fill the frame and the background is intrusive. To that end I use a macro lens of around 100 -120mm (35mm equivalent). It’s not because I’m necessarily shooting at a 1:1 ratio, it’s just because I’ve found there are very few zoom lens that focus close enough and have a fast aperture to allow control of depth of field.I used to use a Canon DSLR with a Canon EF 100mm f2.8 IS L lens and carry around a Manfrotto 143 Magic Arm Kit to support the lights. I made a video about using that setup some 7 years ago and that can be seen just below. Since making that video I added a full frame 6d, the Canon macro lens, and extra light and a set of TTL wireless flash triggers and consequently found myself schlepping 10-12Kg of kit into the bush on longer and longer forays. Something had to give – and my back did! So fast forward 7 years and I’m now using an Olympus OMD EM1 mk ii with Olympus 60mm f2.8 macro lens. I’ve not given anything up in terms of image quality with this change because I’m generally working at a base ISO of 200 with lighting which means all the usual objections to m4/3 about excessive noise and poor dynamic range have been taken out of the equation. The Olympus 60mm f2.8 is easily the optical equal of Canon’s EF 100mm f2.8 IS macro L lens at less than 1/2 the price and about 1/3 of the weight. The Manfrotto Magic Arm got binned as it was very heavy at 2.7 Kg and replaced with a Manfrotto Table Top Tripod Kit 209, 492 Long which weighs 454g. As far as lighting goes I’m using a Metz 64AF – 1 and an Olympus FL-600R flash with small soft box, snoot and honeycomb grid. The only thing that I have given up is radio TTL triggers for the flash, I’m using a TTL flash sync cable at the moment. I prefer to use the Metz unit when doing a lot of high speed sync work as it is the more powerful of the two. This may change in the New Year, it may not.

 

Lighting diagram for my basic lighting of an orchid.

 

The FL-600R is a flash with a guide number of of 50 (ISO200/m). In addition, it comes with a LED lightt for use when shooting video.

 

Other things in the bag include an 80cm 5 in 1 reflector – I only use the white reflector as the silver is too strong, the gold too garish. Some times I use the diffuser over a plant to cut down on ambient light levels. A Vittorinox CyberTool L is there. It has a good selection of small screwdriver bits that can most screws on a camera body, a set of pliers, wood saw, metal saw and file and a host of other doodads. I once re-assembled my Voigtländer 35mm f2.5 Color-Skopar with it while in on holiday in Beijing. Water – this can be in a 1L bottle for shorter expeditions or a 3L water bladder for longer ones. Extra clothing if needed, sunscreen and insect repellent to avoid nasty encounters. Batteries for camera and flash. Wallet of memory cards. That’s it. The whole process is very simple.

Look Good In Blue*

Going through a bit of a blue phase at the moment.

Scented Sun Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Scented Sun Orchid, Thelymitra macrophylla. Mount Ronan, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 64AF-1 flash. Exposure: aperture priority mode with high speed sync flash I/3200, f4 at ISO 200 with -2 stops exposure compensation.

 

Blue Lady Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Blue lady orchid, Thelymitra crinita, also known as the queen orchid and lily orchid. Mount Ronan, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 mk ii with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 64AF-1 flash. Exposure: Aperture priority mode 1/80 sec, f4 at ISO 200 with -1stop exposure compensation.

 

Granite Sun Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Granite Sun Orchid, Thelymitra petrophila. Mount Ronan, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 mk ii with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens. Exposure: aperture priority 1125 sec, f5.6 at ISO 800.

*  Todays musical reference is to Blondie‘s “Look Good In Blue” taken off their debut album “Blondie” released in December 1976. Some 43 years and eleven album later the band are still touring.

Tyger Tyger, burning bright…

Tyger Tyger, burning bright, 
In the forests of the night; 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
William Blake 1794 from “Songs of Experience
Tasmania does not have a monopoly on the thylacine. Many people believe they can be seen in Western Australia’s Blackwood Valley. Nannup is the focus of Thylacine tourism in Western Australia.
William Blake when he wrote his famous poem was thinking of the Bengal Tiger. We have/had tigers in Australia. Well kind of – hmmmm  not really. The Tasmanian tiger or to give it its proper name the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) once roamed all over Australia. But by the time the island continent was colonised it was restricted to the rain forests of Tasmania. I wrote a blog post about them a while ago. The thylacine is a tourist draw card in Tassie and it has become an icon for the tourist industry, but they don’t have a monopoly on it. Down in the South West corner of Western Australia, in the Blackwood Valley is the sleepy town of Nannup. Many of the locals are convinced that the Thylacine roams the forests in the valley and consequently it is now part of Nannup’s tourism campaign.

 

As it would happen we found ourselves in Nannup the other week. We weren’t looking for the tiger, but we certainly found them as we walked up and down the main street. Again like in Tassie the thylacine has been “gnomified” and can be found in front gardens all over the shop.

 

Frida was none too pleased with her thylacine encounter in Nannup.

 

It’s not the first time we’d visited the town, but we’d not been for a while and it had changed quite a bit. With the winding down of the forestry industry Nannup is seriously chasing the tourist dollar and the place has been titivated to reflect that. Once you were hard pushed to get a decent coffee now it seems that every other building is a cafe. It presents as a nice up beat place with a friendly vibe.

 

One of the Nannup locals, a Western Brush Wallaby (Macropus irma) also known as the black-gloved wallaby. Nannup, Western Australia.

 

… and they proved to be very friendly.

Our accommodation was ideally located in the forest and only a stone’s throw from Kondil Wildflower Park. The park consists of new growth forest which contains an incredible diversity of flora. There are three walking trails within the park and I walked two of them. The Woody Pear Walk which is a 1 Km easy walk trail and the the Wildflower Wander which according to the information board is 3.5 Km but according to my GPS is 4.9 Km – either way it’s an easy walk on well sign posted trails.

 

 

Below are some of the orchids I found while walking around.

 

Bird Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Bird Orchid, Pterostylis barbata. Nannup, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f4 at ISO 1000.

 

Leaping Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Leaping spider orchid, Caladenia macrostylis. Nannup, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm macro lens. Exposure: 1/60 sec, f8, ISO 3200.

 

Albino Silky Blue Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Albino Silky Blue Orchid, Cyanicula sericea. Nannup, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm macro lens. Exposure: 1/125 sec, f4 at ISO 200.

 

Silky Blue Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Silky Blue Orchid, Cyanicula sericea. Nannup, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with Olympus m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens. Exposure: 1/100, f5.6 at ISO 1000.

 

Warty Hammer Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Warty Hammer Orchid, Drakaea livida. Nannup, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM 1 mk ii with m.Zuiko 60mm f2.8 macro lens. Exposure: 1/30 sec, f8 at ISO 64.

 

Spring Is Springing

Red Capped Robin by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Red Capped Robin, Petroica goodenovi, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm f4-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f6.3 at ISO 1000 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Tomorrow here in Western Australia is the first day of spring. I don’t think Mother Nature got the memo as the bush around York sprung into life a couple of weeks ago. Flowers are bursting into bloom and the birds are in a frenzy of nest building and dancing around trying to attract mates. This means that I have also sprung into action trying to document as much of thais activity as possible. The cameras are working over time.

 

Common Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The unusual lutea or “yellow” form of the common donkey orchid (Diuris corymbosa). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF 100mm f2.8 IS L macro lens. Exposure: 1/800 sec, f8 at ISO 400.

 

Green Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Green Spider Orchid, also known as the Fringed Mantis Orchid (Caladenia falcata). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/160 sec, f5.6 at ISO 400.

 

White Spider Orchids by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
White Spider Orchids, Caladenia longicauda, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority with off camera flash 1/50 sec, f11 at ISO 100 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

Winter Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Winter Donkey Orchid, Diuris brumalis, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/25 sec, f8 at ISO 100.

 

Brown Honeyeater by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Brown Honeyeater, Lichmera indistincta, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f13 at ISO 200 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Western Whistler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Female Western Whistler, Pachycephala occidentalis,, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f11 at ISO 200.

 

The Hills Are Alive…

…  with flowers. Definitely not Julie Andrews and the ghastly singing Von Trapps.

When people think about Australian biodiversity and nature hot spots they automatically think of the rainforests of North Queensland, Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory or Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park in Tasmania. If prodded a little bit Western Australians might mention the Stirling Ranges National Park. But what if I were to tell you that there is a very significant region of biodiversity, a landscape that is still in its pristine state (i.e. has never been cleared) that is less than two hours drive from Perth? That it contains more than 1400 species of flowering plant, 24 of which are unique and not found anywhere else, there are 78 different species of bird, and there are ancient Aboriginal artefacts. So where is this place? Wongan Hills.

The name Wongan Hills comes from the Nyoongar Wongan Katta which means talking or whispering hills. The range of hills, which are about 10 north-west of the townsite are the largest single area of natural vegetation remaining in the northern wheatbelt. It is spring when everything happens – there is a truly spectacular display of wildflowers. I focus on native orchids and it is absolutely gobsmacking the number of different species and the sheer quantity of them. In the space of a morning’s walk around we found ten different species and they were totally new to me. Below are the fruits of that trip.

 

Pink Candy Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pink Candy Orchid, Caladenia hirta subsp. rosea. Christmas Rock, Wongan Hills, Western Australia.Exposure: manual 1/125 s at f/8.0, Iso 200. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens, TTL fill flash provided by Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash.

 

Chameleon Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Chameleon Spider Orchid, Caladenia dimidia. Christmas Rock, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with Olympus 60mm f2.8 macro lens, with Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: aperture priority 1/80 s at f/8.0 with -1 stop exposure compensation and TTL flash.

 

Yellow Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Yellow Spider Orchid, Caladenia denticulata subsp. denticulata. Christmas Rock, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Exposure: manual 1/160th sec, f8, ISO 200 with TTL flash. Olympus OMD EM1, OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens, Metz mecablitz 15 MS-1 ringflash.

 

 

Salt Lake Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Salt lake spider orchid ( Caladenia exilis subsp. exilis). Roger’s Reserve, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: Manual mode, 1/250 s at f/8.0 ISO 200.

 

 

Clown Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Clown orchid (Caladenia roei) also known as ant orchid, man orchid and jack-in-the-box orchid. Christmas Rock, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: aperture priority 1/50 s at f/8.0 at ISO 200 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

 

Mottled Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Mottled donkey orchid, Diursis sp. ‘Wyalkatchem’. Christmas Rock, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens. Exposure: aperture priority mode 1/80 s at f/8.0 ISO 200 with -1 stop exposure compensation and flash from Metz 15MS-1 ring flash.

 

 

Yellow Granite Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Yellow Granite Donkey Orchid, Diursis hazelii. Mount Matilda, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: Manual mode 1/100 s at f/4.0 ISO 200.

 

 

Sugar Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Sugar Orchid, Ericksonella saccharata. Mount Matilda, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: Manual mode, 1/80 s at f/5.6 ISO 200.

 

 

Dainty Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dainty donkey orchid, Diuris sp. ‘north-western wheatbelt’. Rogers Reserve, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: aperture priority with -2 stops exposure compensation 1/125 s at f/5.6 ISO 200.

 

 

Crimson Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Crimson spider orchid, Caladenia footeana. Rogers Reserve, Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.60mm F2.8 Macro lens and Metz 15 MS-1 ring flash. Exposure: Manual mode, 1/200 s at f/8.0 ISO 200.

 

 

The Sky Is Crying*…

…and boy did it pour down. It rained so hard that the drops actually bounced.

I was in a rebellious frame of mind this week. I had downed tools on my latest book project as it turned out I’d received no royalty payments for two years. Not unusual I’m afraid, publishers are notoriously tight at best and blatant rip off merchants at worst. My father was not a politically correct man and one of his favourite jokes was:

“How do get a drink out of a Scotsman?

Stick two fingers down his throat!”

Well it wouldn’t work with my publisher. They are just impervious. The accountant usually has a number of excuses as to why he has not made any payments. The usual one is that his father had just died. Not a word of bullshit he had his father die four times over a six month period. Well the statements have been coming in, but no payments had hit my bank account for two years. So as William Shakespeare had King Lear say “Thou art a boil, a plague sore, an embossed carbuncle” .

I was right royally hacked off and emailed them to say I’m not finishing the current book until I’ve been paid and then I felt the need to go out and do something for me instead of working. So I went to Wireless Hill to photograph orchids in the pouring rain. Make that torrential rain. I’d have stayed drier if I’d have jumped fully clothed into a swimming pool. Anyway despite all that I got four photos I was happy with.

 

Pansy Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pansy orchid, Diuris magnifica. Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens, Phottix Mitros+ speedlite triggered by a Phottix Odin TCU. Exposure: manual mode, 1/160 s at f/8.0 at ISO 100.

 

Dancing Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) aka antelope orchid or bee orchid. Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority, 1/125 s at f/8.0 at ISO 1600.

 

Pansy Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pansy orchids, Diuris magnifica, Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM. Exposure: aperture priority,1/800 s at f/8.0 at ISO 1600.

 

Carousel Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Carousel Spider Orchid, Carousel, Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority, 1/1000 s at f/4.0 at ISO 1600.

The old Canon EOS6d with 100mm f2.8L Macro IS lens performed admirably in the wet and I’m always astounded by the quality of the files it produces, Many would argue that it is not a professional camera due to it having a very basic AF system, poor dynamic range, not properly weather sealed and only having one card slot, but man alive if you can’t produce professional quality work with it then you really need to get some help.

* Today’s musical reference is the song “The Sky Is Crying” written and originally performed by Elmore James in 1959. It was an impromptu song inspired by a downpour of rain. Since then it has become a blues staple with a plethora of artists recording it over the years. My favourite version is still the Elmore James one, but I also like the version by Stevie Ray Vaughan. The video I’ve embedded below features and all star line up of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King and BB King.

Wandering the Winter Wandoo Woodland

As me Uncle Ted would have said it’s been “reeet parky” hereabouts. Or to translate it to English it’s been freezing. It has been very hard to leave a nice warm bed in the mornings. Anyways yesterday I made the effort to go up to Mount Ronan Nature Reserve and take a look to see what’s out. Wasn’t a bad haul.

 

Winter Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Winter donkey orchid (Diuris brumalis), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

 Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dwarf Pink Fairy orchid or Little Pink Fairy Orchid (caladenia reptans subspecies reptans), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

 Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dwarf Pink Fairy orchid or little pink fairy orchid (caladenia reptans subspecies reptans), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

Dark Banded Greenhood Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dark banded greenhood orchid (Pterostylis sanguinea), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

Jug Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Jug orchid or recurved shell orchid (Pterostylis recurva), Mount Ronan, Western australia.

 

Jug Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Jug orchid or recurved shell orchid (Pterostylis recurva), Mount Ronan, Western australia.