Serendipity

Went looking for these…

Blue Beard Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Blue Beard orchid or blue fairy orchid (Pheladenia deformis), Wambyn Nature Reserve.

 

…and found one of these.

Nyingarn by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Nyingarn is the Nyoongar name for the echidna or spiny anteater. This one can be seen digging into a termite mound. Wambyn Nature Reserve, Western Australia.

 

Short Beaked Echidnas or Nyingarn in Nyoongar are also sometimes called spiny anteaters and belong to the Tachyglossidae in the monotreme order of egg-laying mammals and are not related to anteaters found in the Americas or hedgehogs. Together with the platypus, echidnas are the only surviving members of the order Monotremata and are the only living mammals that lay eggs. Now if you think a mama that lays eggs and raises its young in a pouch is weird then one of the other characteristics is even stranger. Their hind feet point rearwards! Yup that’s right, their feet are on backwards. How do echidnas have sex?

 

 

 

 

Carefully! 🙂

Photography …

… it’s a bit like fishing. There’s always the one that got away. It doesn’t matter how prepared you think you are the opportunity presents and disappears in a nano second. One of my photography lecturers used to talk about what he called ‘the retrospective drive home’ where you analyse everything you did and didn’t do that contrived to create that missed opportunity. The frustrating thing is as you try and tell someone about it they invariably say “A photograph or it didn’t happen”.  Well this time I’ve got the photos to prove it! Sort of.

The other day I was walking along the Swan River foreshore at Claremont when I saw an Osprey drop like a stone from the air and scoop up a fish.  In less than the blink of an eye it was over. I was ready the camera was out of the bag and had a long lens fitted, it was switched on and the settings were optimised. So what did I get?

The osprey making its escape with catch of the day.

With some Photoshop magic this is what I got.

 

That was the best I could get – pathetic isn’t it? There I am with (hang on the other half may read this) an untold amount of money tied up in photo equipment and this is it! I remember watching the original Bladerunner where they had a fancy doodad that could extract a useable photo out of some ridiculous enlargement. You know that film was set in 2019 and it is now 2018 and we haven’t got that fancy photo doodad let alone flying cars. The future is such a disappointment. So as I walk away from the scene looking dismally at the LCD on the back of the camera I’m mentally kicking my backside.

Half an hour later I hear a commotion coming from the water. A shoal of fishing flapping on the surface coming on to the shoreline. Low and behold a fin and then a head break the surface. It’s a pair of bottle nosed dolphins driving fish into the shore. With the relaxes of a dead cat I leap into action and fire off a burst.

 

Claremont Foreshore Walk by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Indo-Pacific Bottle Nosed Dolphins can often be seen in in Freshwater Bay. They often drive shoals of fish into towards the shore to make hunting easier. They also feed on the crabs found on the sandbar.

 

Well this time I got a sharp photo of something recognisable as a dolphin. But that is the best I got. This wildlife photography lark is hard – the wildlife aren’t giving me chance.

Breakfast Interrupted

The other morning just as I was about to have my shower I heard a commotion on my front veranda. Quickly putting on my dressing gown (I don’t want to scare the neighbours) I went and looked out to see what was going on. To my delight a collared sparrowhawk had perched on the rail to eat its prey. I quickly ran to my office and grabbed a camera and long lens and started shooting.

 

Breakfast Interupted by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A perching collared sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrhocehalua) preparing to eat its freshly caught prey. York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.40-150mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/320 th sec, f4 at ISO 200.

 

 

The commotion was caused by the resident Willie Wagtails (Rhipidura leucophrys leucophrys). For the non Aussies among us the Willie Wagtail is a tiny insect-eating bird whose bossiness and boldness knows no bounds and they will often attempt to chase off larger animals from their territory. That was what happening here hence all the noise.

 

Breakfast Interupted by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Willie Wagtails (Rhipidura leucophrys leucophrys) are a tiny insect-eating bird whose boldness knows no bounds. Here one is trying to chase off a feeding collared sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrhocehalus). York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.40-150mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f4 at ISO 800.

 

 

The Willie Wagtails made several sorties to no avail. Although the collared sparrowhawk’s feathers became a little ruffled at the constant harassment of the tiny feathered furies it did not move on and eventually the small birds gave up and left.

 

Breakfast Interupted by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Willie Wagtails (Rhipidura leucophrys leucophrys) are a tiny insect-eating bird whose boldness knows no bounds. Here one is trying to chase off a feeding collared sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrhocehalus). York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with Olympus M.40-150mm F2.8 lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f4 at ISO 800.

 

 

The raptor only left when I tried to move closer to get a better photo.

 

Breakfast Interupted by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A perching collared sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrhocehalua) preparing to eat it’s freshly caught prey. York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.75-300mm F4.8-6.7 II lens. Exposure: 1/400 sec, f6.7 at ISO 800.

 

 

Tales From The Riverbank

Yellow-billed Spoonbill (Platalea flavipes) on the banks of the River Avon in York, Western Australia. Olympus OMD EM1 with OLYMPUS M.75-300mm F4.8-6.7 II lens. Exposure: 1/250 s at f/6.7 ISO 800.

 

There’s no denying that summer and autumn here in the Wheatbelt of Western Australia is hot. The best time of day is just after sun up – the air is cool and refreshing. That is when I take Frida for her daily walk. Sometimes I also take a camera as well and on this morning I was rewarded with this yellow-billed spoonbill backlit by the sun.