Spring Is Springing

Red Capped Robin by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Red Capped Robin, Petroica goodenovi, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic Leica 100-400mm f4-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f6.3 at ISO 1000 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Tomorrow here in Western Australia is the first day of spring. I don’t think Mother Nature got the memo as the bush around York sprung into life a couple of weeks ago. Flowers are bursting into bloom and the birds are in a frenzy of nest building and dancing around trying to attract mates. This means that I have also sprung into action trying to document as much of thais activity as possible. The cameras are working over time.

 

Common Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
The unusual lutea or “yellow” form of the common donkey orchid (Diuris corymbosa). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF 100mm f2.8 IS L macro lens. Exposure: 1/800 sec, f8 at ISO 400.

 

Green Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Green Spider Orchid, also known as the Fringed Mantis Orchid (Caladenia falcata). Talbot Hall, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/160 sec, f5.6 at ISO 400.

 

White Spider Orchids by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
White Spider Orchids, Caladenia longicauda, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority with off camera flash 1/50 sec, f11 at ISO 100 with -1 stop exposure compensation.

 

Winter Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Winter Donkey Orchid, Diuris brumalis, Wambyn Reserve, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: 1/25 sec, f8 at ISO 100.

 

Brown Honeyeater by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Brown Honeyeater, Lichmera indistincta, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f13 at ISO 200 with -2/3 stop exposure compensation.

 

Western Whistler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Female Western Whistler, Pachycephala occidentalis,, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Panasonic G85 with Panasonic LEICA DG 100-400/F4.0-6.3 lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f11 at ISO 200.

 

What A Whopper!

The Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 DG OS Contemporary lens is part of Sigma’s Global Vision line of lenses. It offers an inexpensive way of getting into wildlife photography.

 

Not so long ago I looked at the the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmar 100-400 f4-6.3 ASPH Power OIS lens for micro four thirds, well today I’m looking at an alternative lens for APS and full frame cameras – the Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 DG OS Contemporary lens. Now confusingly Sigma make two versions of the 150-600 and they are labelled the Sport and Contemporary. The-Digital-Picture.com has put up a good article explaining the difference between the two. The main ones are price and weight with the Contemporary being a 1Kg lighter and $1200 AUD cheaper. This is quite a significant difference and I for one prefer a lighter lens and a heavier wallet. The Contemporary is part of Sigma’s Global Vision line of lenses and is thus compatible with the Sigma TC-1401 1.4x Teleconverter which allows auto focus to work to a maximum of f8 while wide open if your camera supports this feature. This is an interesting option as it allows a reach of 860mm on full frame and a humongous 1376mm on an APSC sensor which is impressive reach for a lens and converter costing less than $2000 AUD. I didn’t happen to look at this option because none of my Canon DSLRs allow f8 auto focusing. shuttermuse.com has an article on f8 focusing with extenders or teleconverters and a list of compatible Canon DSLRs. This does not apply to the mirrorless R and RP which have f11 auto focusing.

 

Lens mounts available Canon EF

Nikon F

Sigma SA

Focal length 150-600mm
Angle of view 4.1° – 16.4°
Aperture range f5/6.3 to f22/27
Filter size 95mm
Minimum focusing distance 2.8 metres
Maximum magnification 1:4.9
Focusing Silent HSM with internal focusing and manual override
Aperture blades 9
Lens construction 20 elements in 14 groups with 1 FLD and 3 SLD elements
Image stabilisation Yes – 3 stops equivalent
Length 26cm
Diameter 10.5cm
Weight 1.93Kg without lens hood and tripod collar.

 

 

Fully extended to the 600mm focal length the lens is a beast. There is no sign of any wobble in the zoom extension.

Physically this is a large lens, it stands head and shoulders above my Canon 70-200mm f2.8 IS L lens which in itself quite a large lens. The 150-600 is also 500g heavier. At 2.1 Kg with lens hood and tripod collar attached it definitely has heft to it. Interestingly Sigma refer to it as a lightweight lens, I suppose it’s all a matter of perspective as the Panasonic Leica 100-400 is 0.985 Kg so the Sigma feels gargantuan compared to it while the Canon EF 600 mm f4L IS is over 3Kg so the Sigma then seems svelte and compact. The lens body is made out of what Sigma calls a Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) which is substantially stronger than conventional polycarbonates while having similar thermal expansion properties to aluminium. The lens mount is made of chromium plated brass which should ensure a long life. All in all it feels a well made and rugged lens, it may feel like plastic but the TSC body feels substantial and gives the impression of being very durable with no creaking or flexing. The Sigma 150-600 is advertised as being dust and splash proof but on closer reading of Sigma’s spec sheet there is only one seal and that is at the lens mount. If you want better then you’ll have to spring for the Sports version.

 

The Canon EF lens mount is made of chromium plated brass.

When looking at the lens from the front there is a large ribbed rubber zoom ring that has a long throw of about 160º. The action is smooth and feels not too tight nor too loose. As you rotate the zoom ring the lens barrel extends by 8cm. The extension feels secure with no slop or wobble. Just behind the zoom ring on the lefthand side is a zoom lock switch which can lock the zoom ring at the 150mm focal length to prevent zoom creep while carrying the lens. The focusing ring is narrow ribbed rubber and allows you to manually adjust focus while the lens is in the autofocus mode. There are no hard stops which might concern you if you were to use the lens for video. Behind the focusing ring is a panel of four switches and they are:

  • An AF switch allowing to choose between AF, MF and MO (Manual Override)
  • A focus limiter switch allowing a choice of full range, 10m to ∞, and 2.8 to 10m.
  • An optical stabilisation switch that gives a choice of off, on and a panning mode.
  • A custom switch that allows you to select two custom modes that can be programmed using the Sigma FD-11 USB Dock

 

There are three switches on the lens barrel. One fotr focus modes, the second a focus limiter and the third is for the optical stabilisation.

 

The focus distance scale is behind a window just below the the focus ring.

Above the switches is a window showing the focusing scale and then behind that is the lens collar. The lens collar allows you to turn the camera from horizontal to vertical while mounted on a tripod, but, unfortunately there are no detents to allow you to do this while looking through the viewfinder of the camera, you have to align the marks on the collar with those on the lens body. The tripod collar can be detached and thoughtfully Sigma provide a cosmetic rubber ring to slide over the lugs that hold the collar in place. The lens comes with a large plastic lens hood the size of a flower pot, it seems sturdy enough and bayonets into place and a nice touch  is that is ribbed internally to prevent reflections. The 150-600 has a 95mm filter thread which means filters will be expensive and potentially hard to get. In terms of accessories Sigma provide a nice well padded lens case, a shoulder strap for it and a Sigma branded camera strap. Like all Sigma lenses you get a lot for the money you spend. Nice one Sigma!

The 150-600 has a 95mm filter thread which means filters will be the size of dinner plates, be expensive and potentially hard to get.

I tested the lens on a Canon EOS 6d and an EOS 550d to see how it would perform on both crop and full frame cameras. In terms of AF performance as neither of those cameras have what can be considered state of the art AF systems, in fact it is over twelve years old, the lens did very well. The single point AF using the centre point was fast and precise and well capable of fixing on small birds amongst foliage. In terms of continuous AF on the EOS 550d the camera was the limitation being only able to shoot 6 frame bursts in RAW, but out of my six shots when tracking my dog trotting five of the six would be in focus. The 6d is able to shoot 4.5 frames per second for 15 frames and on the trotting bull terrier test it managed 12 frames in focus.

 

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When it came to BIF (birds in flight not fisticuffs) the AF was more than capable of focusing on and tracking medium to large birds. It really struggled with small birds especially swallows. Put it on a better camera and I’m sure you’d get better results.

 

Australian White Ibis, by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Australian white ibis, Threskiornis molucca, Herdsman Lake, Western Australia.

 

My primary use for a lens like this is handheld bird photography, and as such I didn’t really give the image stabilisation a workout as I seldom use a shutter speed below 1/500 sec. But messing around at home in the house and garden I figured it was good for three stops. Mind you I do have steady hands so your experience may differ from mine.

 

 

The optical construction of the lens is twenty elements in fourteen groups with 1 FLD and 3 SLD elements. The FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) glass element, which offers performance equivalent to fluorite.  Canon and other manufacturers have used synthetically grown crystals of calcium fluoride components in lenses to aid apochromatic design, and to reduce light dispersion so lenses made from it exhibit less chromatic aberration. What Sigma has done is use newer glasses and computer-aided design to render the use of fluorite crystals unnecessary. Sigma claim that the FLD element is “highly transparent, its refractive index and dispersion are extremely low as compared to conventional types of glass. It offers characteristics very similar to those of fluorite, which is valued for its anomalous dispersion. These characteristics minimize residual chromatic aberration (secondary spectrum), which cannot be corrected by ordinary optical glass, while helping to produce sharp, high-contrast images.” (https://sigmaphoto.com.au). The three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass elements also help to minimize chromatic aberration. To help achieve attractive out of focus transitions there are nine rounded aperture blades which should help achieve nice round bokeh balls when shooting specular highlights.

 

 

In terms of optical performance well I’ll deal with full frame and crop separately. First up using the lens on the crop framed 550d. At 150mm the centre of the lens wide open was sharp and contrasty and stayed A as such until f22 when it softened due to the effects of diffraction. At the edges the peak performance was attained at f11 and remained until f22 when it softened again. At 600mm the centre wide open was a little soft and lacking in contrast. This improved by f8 and then deteriorated at f22. The edges weren’t so good – wide open they were soft and lacking contrast and remained so until f22 when they got worse. As for vignetting well at the short end wide open it was apparent, about 1/2 to 1 stop and this disappeared by f8. It was the same story at the long end. Throughout the focal range there is slight pin cushion distortion and some chromatic aberration can also be seen. Open the files up in Lightroom and apply the lens profile and things improve nicely. On the full frame 6d the story is the same except for the vignetting which is naturally worse at around 1-1 1/2 stops which is totally understandable as you are using the whole frame rather than just the central part of the lens coverage.

 

100 % crop from the centre of a New Holland Honeyeater to show how detail is rendered by the Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 Contemporary lens.

 

What’s all this mean in real life. Well if we look at the image for the New Holland Honeyeater which I took at a distance of around 3.5 to 4 metres and then enlarge the section around the head you can see that there is nice feather detail and that the eye is sharper than a very sharp thing. To get much better you’d have to spend an awful lot of money and if we look at the Canon 600mm f4 lens I mentioned earlier that has an eye watering price of $18,500 AUD which is over 11 times the cost of the Sigma. Personally I know that if I plonked $18 K down on a lens I’d be heading for the divorce court which would make the Canon a doubly expensive lens. So for what it costs the Sigma is amazing value.

Below are some examples of bird photography shot with the lens on both a Canon EOS 6d and 550d.

 

Welcome Swallow by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Welcome Swallow, Hirundo neoxxena, Herdsman Lake, Western Australia. Canon 6d with Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary. Exposure: 1/500 sec, f7.1 at ISO 250.

 

Red Capped Robin, by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Red capped robin, Petroica goodenovi, Avon Walk Trail, York, Western Australia. Canon 550d with Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/500, f6.3 at ISO 160.

 

Chestnut-rumped Thornbill by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Chestnut-rumped Thornbill (Acanthiza uropygialis), York, Western Australia. canon 550d with Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f6.3 at ISO 320.

 

Mistletoebird, by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Mistletoebird, Dicaeum hirundinaceum. The Nyoongar name is Minnijit. York, Western Australia. Canon 6d with Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f8 at ISO 1600.

So would I recommend the lens? Yes without hesitation. It performs very well and is sold at a very good price and you can’t argue with that.

Teaser

Been playing with a new lens – and so far I’ve been very impressed and it’s made me reconsider my camera system. I’ll put up a full report in the next week or two. Here are a couple of photos to whet your appetite.

 

Back lit bully. Frida modelling for a lens test.

 

Bully blast off! Frida helping test the auto focus capabilities of a new lens.

 

Both shots were taken with the Canon 6d, which continues to amaze me with its picture quality, and converted to monochrome in AlienSkin’s Exposure 4.

Nice and Easy

Splendid Fairy Wren by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Splendid Fairy-wren, Malarus splendens subs splendens, out of the breeding period. Lake Leschenaultia, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000sec, f6.3 at ISO 6400.

Sometimes I think that have got to be easier ways to enjoy birding and bird photography than dragging 3.5Kg of camera and lens quietly through the bush and trying to get a picture of something that is literally so flighty that the slightest sound sees your subject leave at a tremendous rate of knots.

 

Western Thornbill by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Western Thornbill, Acanthiza inornata. Lake Leschenaultia, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f6.3 at ISO 1000.

 

Case in point. Not so long ago Beloved Significant Other (BSO) went for a trip to Lake Leschenaultia in Chidlow. I spent an age crawling around in the bush looking for a cooperative subject. In that time every small twig that I inadvertently trod on sounded like a thunder clap that sent all the wildlife scurrying for cover in a 5Km radius.

 

Silvereye by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Silvereye, Zosterops lateralis. Lake Leschenaultia, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6D with a Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1250 sec, f6.3 ISO 2500.

Even if you manage to creep up on a suitable subject you then have the problem of photographing something that is 5-10cm and hoping and twitching around like a meth user suffering from St Vitus’ dance while you are trying to track it and keep it in focus as it darts in and out of the foliage. So I’ve come up with an easier method. The BBQ. If you have BBQ in Australia every animal in the neighbourhood will be trying to relieve you of your food. The little buggers will climb into your lap and pose for photos if food is involved.

 

A picnic feast with the birds of lake Leschenaultia by Helen Amyes (aka BSO). Panasonic Lumix LX5. Exposure: 1/160 sec, f2.8 at ISO 80.

 

Totally Confused

Birds were so much easier back in England. I wrote earlier about how Australian Robins come in an assortment of colours and not just the red breasted ones I grew up with. Well walking down the river bed the other day I see this.

Mistletoebird, by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Mistletoebird, Dicaeum hirundinaceum. The Nyoongar name is Minnijit. York, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f8 at ISO 1600.

 

It’s obviously some sort of robin thinks I as I walk along pondering this new bird. WRONG!!!! It’s a mistletoe bird. First robins come in multiple colours and now birds with red breasts aren’t robins. I think I’m going to stick with penguins – they’re black and white and easy to identify.

 

Penguin Island by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Little penguin or fairy penguin (Eudyptula minor). Penguin Island, Western Australia. Canon EOS 5d with a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens and Canon x2 extender. Exposure: 1/250, f5.6 ISO 1600.

 

 

Paradise Regained

Back in September I wrote about the various birds nesting in the garden. Well autumn is now here and I thought I’d write an update. The white browed babblers have successfully hatched all their eggs which means there has been a population explosion. They are quite curious birds as they live in communal nests and have separate nursery nests as well which they all take turns in raising the chicks. Well now they are embarking on a building program to make a new communal sleeping nest for all the new adults. As a result these funny little grumpy birds are flying in building materials at a great rate of knots.

 

White Browed Babbler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
A delivery of nest material from next door. White browed babbler, Pomatostomus superciliosus. York, Western Australia. Canon 6d with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/640 sec, f6.5 at ISO 500.

 

White Browed Babbler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Queuing on the landing branch waiting to unload. White browed babbler, Pomatostomus superciliosus. York, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/640 sec, f6.3 ISO 320.

 

White Browed Babbler by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Waiting to enter the building site. White browed babbler, Pomatostomus superciliosus. York, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/640 sec, f6.3 at ISO 640.

 

 

We were also quite delighted to have a visitor. While we were talking one afternoon I spotted a Nankeen Kestrel hunting in the field opposite. It didn’t catch anything and left empty-handed. I thought that was that when I heard a bump from the TV aerial so we both ran outside to look, me with my camera and Helen with her binoculars. Sure enough the kestrel had decided our aerial would make a very good observation perch. It remained there quite unfazed for quite a while. It was only when I tried to get closer for a better photo that it decided to leave.

 

Nankeen Kestral by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Nankeen kestrel, Falco cenchroides cenchroides. York, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens. Exposure: 1/1000 sec, f8 at ISO 320.

 

Make Do

I’ve not had access to a proper studio since I left TAFE (college) where I abused, I mean used the excellent facilities. Now working from home I have to make do with whatever is around the house and a few well-chosen bits of photo kit. In the above pic I’m doing a product shot of back pack in the sitting room. I don’t have a white infinity curve on a product table so I use a small Ikea coffee table covered in a white shower curtain and a white double sheet as the background. I want the backpack on a white fore ground and against a white background. Experience has taught me that if a light the background with a flash gun (speed light to our American readers) and over expose by 1 stop it will show as pure white. The subject is lit by two flash guns in brolly boxes arranged at 45º to each other. The camera sits on a tripod and the flashes are triggered wirelessly using a Phottix Odin transmitter. Unlike a lot of photographers I shoot using TTL control and use flash exposure compensation on each flash to control the lighting ratio which in this case is 2:1 or the key light (the black brolly) is set to be twice as powerful as the fill light. All very simple really.

The Sky Is Crying*…

…and boy did it pour down. It rained so hard that the drops actually bounced.

I was in a rebellious frame of mind this week. I had downed tools on my latest book project as it turned out I’d received no royalty payments for two years. Not unusual I’m afraid, publishers are notoriously tight at best and blatant rip off merchants at worst. My father was not a politically correct man and one of his favourite jokes was:

“How do get a drink out of a Scotsman?

Stick two fingers down his throat!”

Well it wouldn’t work with my publisher. They are just impervious. The accountant usually has a number of excuses as to why he has not made any payments. The usual one is that his father had just died. Not a word of bullshit he had his father die four times over a six month period. Well the statements have been coming in, but no payments had hit my bank account for two years. So as William Shakespeare had King Lear say “Thou art a boil, a plague sore, an embossed carbuncle” .

I was right royally hacked off and emailed them to say I’m not finishing the current book until I’ve been paid and then I felt the need to go out and do something for me instead of working. So I went to Wireless Hill to photograph orchids in the pouring rain. Make that torrential rain. I’d have stayed drier if I’d have jumped fully clothed into a swimming pool. Anyway despite all that I got four photos I was happy with.

 

Pansy Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pansy orchid, Diuris magnifica. Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens, Phottix Mitros+ speedlite triggered by a Phottix Odin TCU. Exposure: manual mode, 1/160 s at f/8.0 at ISO 100.

 

Dancing Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) aka antelope orchid or bee orchid. Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority, 1/125 s at f/8.0 at ISO 1600.

 

Pansy Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Pansy orchids, Diuris magnifica, Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS 6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM. Exposure: aperture priority,1/800 s at f/8.0 at ISO 1600.

 

Carousel Spider Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Carousel Spider Orchid, Carousel, Wireless Hill, Western Australia. Canon EOS6d with Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. Exposure: aperture priority, 1/1000 s at f/4.0 at ISO 1600.

The old Canon EOS6d with 100mm f2.8L Macro IS lens performed admirably in the wet and I’m always astounded by the quality of the files it produces, Many would argue that it is not a professional camera due to it having a very basic AF system, poor dynamic range, not properly weather sealed and only having one card slot, but man alive if you can’t produce professional quality work with it then you really need to get some help.

* Today’s musical reference is the song “The Sky Is Crying” written and originally performed by Elmore James in 1959. It was an impromptu song inspired by a downpour of rain. Since then it has become a blues staple with a plethora of artists recording it over the years. My favourite version is still the Elmore James one, but I also like the version by Stevie Ray Vaughan. The video I’ve embedded below features and all star line up of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King and BB King.

Wandering the Winter Wandoo Woodland

As me Uncle Ted would have said it’s been “reeet parky” hereabouts. Or to translate it to English it’s been freezing. It has been very hard to leave a nice warm bed in the mornings. Anyways yesterday I made the effort to go up to Mount Ronan Nature Reserve and take a look to see what’s out. Wasn’t a bad haul.

 

Winter Donkey Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Winter donkey orchid (Diuris brumalis), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

 Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dwarf Pink Fairy orchid or Little Pink Fairy Orchid (caladenia reptans subspecies reptans), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

 Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dwarf Pink Fairy orchid or little pink fairy orchid (caladenia reptans subspecies reptans), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

Dark Banded Greenhood Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Dark banded greenhood orchid (Pterostylis sanguinea), Mount Ronan, Western Australia.

 

Jug Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Jug orchid or recurved shell orchid (Pterostylis recurva), Mount Ronan, Western australia.

 

Jug Orchid by Paul Amyes on 500px.com
Jug orchid or recurved shell orchid (Pterostylis recurva), Mount Ronan, Western australia.